COVID-Free Clinic

In connection with the spread of the new coronavirus (COVID-19) and in the light of the current situation and information, the Proton Therapy Center has adopted several measures and recommendations in order to protect the safety of our patients and staff.

Thanks to these measures we have promptly introduced, we have been able to continue to operate ensuring optimal continuum of cancer care to adult and paediatric patients worldwide during the COVID-19 pandemic.

🤝 It is prohibited to shake hands due to the risk of transmission of the virus.
🤭 Do not touch your face. Use the disinfectant to clean your hands.
🗣️ Cough or sneeze into your elbow, covering your mouth.
🥵 If you have a fever, call us and let us know before coming to the clinic.
😷 Everyone entering the building is required to wear a mask.
🌡️ Upon arrival to the clinic, patients’ temperature is taken.

It is prohibited to shake hands due to the
 risk of transmission of the virus.
Do not touch your eyes and face. 
Use the disinfectant to clean your hands.
Cough or sneeze into your elbow, 
covering your mouth.
If you have a fever, call us and let us know before coming to the clinic.
Everyone entering the building is required to wear a mask.

Upon arrival to the clinic, patients’ temperature is taken.

Starting March 16, 2020, we have introduced a new system which allows employees to keep a safe distance from each other, a strict hygienic entry regime, and higher level of disinfection of the premises. As an extra precaution, doctors work on rotation in two separate shifts minimising the risk to both medical staff and our patients.

Patients need to follow their appointments schedule strictly, so that the centre is never crowded.

Additionally, in order to meet our commitment and at the same time protect everyone at the Proton Therapy Center (patients and staff), it is necessary that all patients coming from abroad undergo COVID-19 testing. Our treatment coordinators will be happy to help you find the closest clinic to your home.

Patients Coming From Abroad

The first step is to assess suitability for proton irradiation, which you can do remotely from the comfort of your home. This assessment is free and it only takes a few business days.

Should you be suitable for treatment at our facility, we can offer you a remote consultation with one of our oncologists to discuss treatment in greater detail.

Should you decide to go ahead with treatment at our facility, we will provide you with an official document which will allow you to travel.

Although airway transportation is limited, there are some flights coming to Prague. Alternatively, it is possible to reach us by car.

Should none of the options above be suitable for you, we cooperate with Meditrans ambulance service which can transport patients to Prague from anywhere in Europe and UK. Should this be your preferred option, our treatment coordinators will be happy to arrange it for you.

We hope you will appreciate and support our efforts. Only with mutual cooperation the therapy will be safe for you, other patients, and the Proton Therapy Center employees.

We are delighted to say, thanks to the favourable epidemiological conditions in the Czech Republic, the situation will soon return to normal.

We will be happy to provide you with more detailed information. Please do not hesitate to contact us.

Study Shows Proton Therapy Improves Overall Survival in Patients with Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma

Chordomas and chondrosarcomas are difficult to manage using conventional cancer treatment methods. Areas of the body frequently affected by this type of cancer include the spine, skull, pelvis, hip, and shoulder.

Effective treatment of these tumours using surgical resection is not usually achievable due to neurovascular involvement. As a result, recurrence of the tumour when surgery is used in isolation poses a significant risk for both chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Due to the low risk of metastasis and relative chemoresistance, the use of definitive radiotherapy or perioperative radiotherapy is very important in maintaining local control.

Previous research has shown proton therapy to be beneficial in treating these types of tumours. Using protons, health professionals are able to treat chordoma and chondrosarcoma with higher doses of radiation due to the increased accuracy of proton therapy.

A 2019 study published in the journal ‘Cancer’ entitled: The role of dose escalation and proton therapy in perioperative or definitive treatment of chondrosarcoma and chordoma has shown that proton therapy improves overall survival for those with these forms of cancer.

This study analysed a total of 863 patients with chondrosarcoma and 715 patients with chordoma treated with proton or conventional radiation therapy. The primary endpoint of overall survival (OS) was evaluated, and clinical features, including age, sex, grade, clinical stage, and Charlson‐Deyo comorbidity index, were compared.

This study found that for chondrosarcoma, a high radiation dose of proton therapy was associated with improved OS at 5 years.

For chordoma, proton therapy was associated with improved OS at 5 years and a high dose for chordoma was significant for improved OS.

The authors concluded that in the largest retrospective series to date, dose escalation and proton radiotherapy were associated with improved overall survival in patients with chondrosarcoma and chordoma. Evidence continues to accumulate in support of improved outcomes with high‐dose proton therapy in the treatment of chordoma and chondrosarcoma with acceptable toxicity.

If you or a loved one are suffering with chordoma or chondrosarcoma, the Prague Proton Therapy Center oncologists are available for consultation.

Associated Resources:

DEGRO. Stellungnahme zur Strahlentherapie mit Protonen in Deutschland Juni 2015.

T. F. DeLaney, N. J. Liebsch, F. X. Pedlow et al., “Phase II study of high-dose photon/proton radiotherapy in the management of spine sarcomas,” International Journal of Radiation Oncology∗Biology∗Physics, vol. 74, no. 3, pp. 732–739, 2009.

E. B. Holliday, H. S. Mitra, J. S. Somerson et al., “Postoperative proton therapy for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the spine: adjuvant versus salvage radiation therapy,” Spine, vol. 40, no. 8, pp. 544–549, 2015.

B. Rombi, T.F. DeLaney, S.M. MacDonald, et al. “Proton radiotherapy for pediatric Ewing’s sarcoma: initial clinical outcomes” Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, 82 (2012), pp. 1142-1148